Book Review: Igifu

“Like it or not, the death of our loved ones has fueled us – not with hate, not with vengefulness, but with an energy that nothing can ever defeat. That strength lives in you too, don’t let anyone try to tell you to get over your loss, not if that means saying goodbye to your dead. You can’t: they’ll never leave you, they stay by your side to give you the courage to live, to triumph over obstacles” – Scholastique Mukasonga, Igifu.

Igifu, meaning hunger, it’s a collection of autobiographical stories surrounding the plight of Tutsis in Rwanda, before and after the 1994 genocide. But unlike “Cockroaches”, Mukasonga’s memoir, it doesn’t depict the terrible violence but focused on a diversity of interesting characters, their pain, resilience and hope. It’s funny and deep and we get this beautiful vignettes of Tutsis’ traditional way of life. I particularly enjoyed the story of Helena, the most beautiful Tutsi woman in the village, her rise and fall. I can not recommend Igifu enough.

Author: Carla Hafez

Reader of mostly literary fiction and own-voices fiction. Latina. Feminist. Amateur reviewer. Opinionated. Unapologetically progressive. Mom. Wife. Believer.

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